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Press Release

PRESIDENTIAL SUPPORT SERVICE
PRESS RELEASE


The Presidential Support Service announces that the President of the Republic, José
Eduardo dos Santos, while making use of the competencies conferred upon him by the
Constitutional Law and the Electoral Law, has issued a presidential decree on this day of
June 4th, 2008, calling for legislative elections and setting their date for September 5th,
2008 in all national territory.


Moreover, in conformity with the recommendation of the Council of the Republic’s
meeting of June 3rd, the National Assembly shall analyze and legislate the possibility of
extending the voting period, should circumstances occur that are not covered by article
121 of the Electoral Law, and that do not permit all citizens to exercise their right to vote
on September 5th.


In its preamble, the presidential decree reiterates the need for Angolans to exercise their
right to vote in a free, conscious, and responsible manner in order to elect their
representatives and entrust them the responsibility of guiding the fate of the Nation.


PRESIDENTIAL SUPPORT SERVICE, Luanda, June 4th, 2008.-

Press Release

Your Excellencies Heads of State and Government,

Distinguished Members of the Security Council of the United Nations,

Illustrious Members of the Peace and Security Council of the African Union,

Distinguished Guests,


Ladies and Gentlemen,

Mr. Chairman,


I would like to start by conveying our appreciation to you for holding this high-level session on peace and security in Africa.


I am greatly honored to participate in this forum on behalf of the President of the Republic of Angola, His Excellency José Eduardo dos Santos, who, for imponderable reasons, could not travel to New York.
Allow me to congratulate you, Mr. Chairman, on behalf of my Government and on my own behalf, for the wise manner in which you have been conducting the work of the Security Council, in particular for the opportunity and pertinence of including in its agenda an issue that is vital to the good performance of the Council, and that is related to peace and security in Africa.


I would equally like to express my appreciation to the previous President of this Council for the constructive manner in which he, together with the UN Secretary-General, contributed to the realization of this important High-level Session, which happens at a juncture when both the UN and the AU are confronted with multiple and complex challenges linked to peace and development in the African continent.

Mr. Chairman,
On the occasion of the Security Council Session of 2007 on the same topic, under the French presidency, the Council recognized, among other aspects, the fundamental role of Regional and Sub-regional Organizations in the prevention and resolution of conflicts on the basis Chapter VIII of the UN Charter, as well as of resolutions 1625 and 1631, both from 2005, to which we can add Presidential Declaration 2005/39.

The Security Council reiterated the importance of the relevant paragraphs of the Declaration of the 2005 Summit (A/RES/60/1), on the need for development aid for Africa, and the strengthening of the African Union’s operational capacity for peacekeeping operations for a 10-year period.

Africa is aware that the principal causes for the conflicts in the continent have a direct relationship with circumstances resulting from the complexity of its ethnic and linguistic phenomena; however they are also fundamentally linked to the underdevelopment that is a consequence of the undeniable legacy of a long period of colonization that dramatically marked the course of its history.

It is in that context that the African Union, along with Sub-regional Economic Communities, has been deeply engaged in the operationalization of its peace and security structures, namely the African Standby Force, the Early Warning System, the Panel of Wise and the Special Fund for Peace and Security.

We understand that in order for the UN and the AU to be able to adequately counter the constraints related to the efficiency of the necessary cooperation in the domain of conflict prevention, management and resolution, it is utmost necessary to address the issues of peace and security in an inclusive manner, not dissociating them from development problems.

The convergence of these elements is crucial for the success of peacekeeping operations. This is one of the lessons we learned while following and observing certain conflict resolution, peace consolidation,
and economic reconstruction processes as the first president of the Peacebuilding Commission of the United Nations, in the period of 2006/2007.

Mr. Chairman,
As we have already mentioned, peace and social development are correlated elements that complement one another. Having achieved peace, the Republic of Angola has been undertaking enormous efforts towards the creation of subjective and material conditions for its reconstruction, with a view to reaching sustained development.

The accomplishments of my Government have deserved the recognition of all the Angolan society and the international community, in light of the tangible results already reached in the recovery of the economic and social infrastructures destroyed during the war, and the construction of new infrastructures.
Judging from the positive trend in our economic growth, which is above of 19%, our perspectives are frankly encouraging.

It is in this perspective that the Angolan Government conceived and is implementing the National Strategy of Poverty Reduction in order to reach the human development indicators as avowed in the Millennium Declaration.
Our experience has demonstrated that in the African context, the consolidation of peace results from the combination of various factors, such as the conception and implementation of a coherent policy of national reconciliation; the implementation of economic reforms that favor the provision of ample space for free initiative on the part of national and foreign citizens; the constant reinforcement of the state authority as an imperative condition for the consolidation of democratic institutions; the respect for, and safeguard of human rights as a component of peace, democracy and development, among others.

Indeed, under the able leadership of His Excellency the President of the Republic, José Eduardo dos Santos, Angola has been removing the hurdles that hindered the smile of its People.

Today, only six years after the end of the internal conflict that dilacerated the country during several decades, peace and national reconciliation are consolidated, and with them democracy, whose consecration will be strengthened with the holding, for the second time in the history of Angola, of the legislative and presidential elections foreseen for 2008 and 2009, respectively.

The Republic of Angola reiterates, therefore, its firm commitment to working in a self-sacrificing and altruistic manner in the Peace and Security Council of the African Union, and in the sub-regional organizations of which it is a member, towards helping to find peaceful solutions for the conflicts that still persist in certain countries of our continent.

To this effect, my Government considers of extreme importance the cooperation between the African Union and the United Nations.

I would like to state that my delegation will support the deliberative text that will result from our debate.

Thank you very much.

STATEMENT BY HIS EXCELLENCY AMBASSADOR ISMAEL ABRAÃO GASPAR MARTINS PERMANENT REPRESENTATIVE OF ANGOLA, IN HIS CAPACITY AS CHAIRMAN OF THE PERMANENT COMMITTEE OF THE ZONE OF PEACE AND COOPERATION OF THE SOUTH ATLANTIC
 
December 11, 2008
 
 
Mr. President,
 
 
My delegation is taking the floor in its capacity as Chairman of the Zone of Peace and Cooperation of the South Atlantic, on behalf of the 24 members of this important mechanism, namely, Angola, Argentina, Benin, Brazil, Cameroon, Cape Verde, Congo, Côte d’Ivoire, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Equatorial Guinea, Gabon, Gambia, Ghana, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Liberia, Namibia, Nigeria, Senegal, São-Tome and Principe, Serra Leone, South Africa, Togo and Uruguay.
 
I would like to underline that the contribution by Angola, referred to in the report, was made on behalf of the 24 members of the Zone following a decision of its Permanent Committee, and reflects our unity in this collective effort.
 
Let me start, Mr. President, by reiterating our satisfaction with the way you have been conducting the work of the most representative organ of the United Nations, the General Assembly. My delegation also thanks the Secretary-General for the presentation of the report, as well as for following up on the implementation of resolution 41/11, on the Zone.
 
The members of the Zone are particularly grateful to the delegation of Colombia and to the Department of Public Information, the Office of Legal Affairs, the FAO, the United Nations Office in Geneva, and the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime, for their contribution to this report and their interest in the issues of the Zone.
 
  
Mr. President,
 
The report presented today to the General Assembly is, per se, eloquent on how the Zoneis making gradual, but steady, significant qualitative changes by creating basic conditions for a fully operational mechanism of South-South Cooperation, where a wide range of partners canfind their space.
 
We are particularly pleased to see how these changes are being noticed and taken into account by our partners as the replies from different bodies contained in the report have clearly referred to the implementation of the Luanda Plan of Action and the Luanda Political Declaration. As a matter of fact, the adoption of the Luanda Plan of Action as a framework for concrete actions was a turning point towards the revitalization of the Zone.
 
We are thankful to all the partners for the actions they have been carrying out in the different countries located within the space of the Zone of Peace and Cooperation of the South Atlantic. However, in our point of view, a regular exchange of information on the activities that partners develop within the space of the Zone is recommendable. This could be done through the Chairmanship. When possible, the Zone could also be invited, through its Chairmanship, to attend events of interest organized for groupings comprising its members. This will also make coordination possible when needed.
 
On our part, while stressing cooperation among ourselves by maximizingthe use of our internal capacities and resources, members of the Zone will spare no effort to involve relevant partners in the materialization of our objectives, including by seeking their expertise for the successful holding of the meetings of the Ad Hoc Working Groups mentioned on paragraph 8 of the present report.
 
For instance, in the past, the United Nations Legal Affairs was instrumental in the holding of an experts meeting on the Law of the Sea in the Zone Member States of the Republic of Congo, (Brazzaville, 1990) and Uruguay (Montevideo, 1991). We would like to see the continuation of this sort of coordinated actions.
 
Another useful example would be employingthe Zone to address the issue of drug trafficking, as its membership comprises countries from South America and Africa that rest onthe coast of the Atlantic Ocean, a transit route used by dealers to transport drugsfrom the origin to the destination.
 
Moreover, individual partners are invited to contribute to this collective effort of the members of the Zone in different fields, as stated in paragraph 4 of General Assembly resolution 61/294.
 
Mr. President,
 
We fully appreciate the positive developments in the fields of peacebuilding, including in member States of the Zone, Serra Leone and Guinea-Bissau are on the agenda of the Peacebuilding Commission, while other members like Liberia, Guinea and Côte d’Ivoire have also benefitted from the assistance of the Peacebuilding Fund.
 
Questions of peace and security and those of development are interrelated and inseparable. This also requires a suitable international environment; the members of the Zone are therefore concerned with the negative developments in the world economy and the persistence of conflicts.
 
We are deeply concerned with the situation prevailing in some parts of Africa, including in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, a member of the Zone, and we hope that no efforts will be spared to overcomethis complex situation, including by combating the illicit exploitation of the natural resources of that country. In addition to that, we are alarmed by the conflict in Somalia and the consequent scourge of piracy that forces ships into the Atlantic Ocean and critically increases its traffic. It is necessary to fight this practice, and more importantly, find a solution to the long-lasting Somali conflict.
 
 
Mr. President,
 
The Zone of Peace and Cooperation of the South Atlantic was established as a mechanism to contribute to the strengthening of international peace and security and to the promotion of the principles and purposes of the United Nations in which we fully believe. The members of the Zone are therefore determined to promote the noble objectives of peace, security and development as rights to be exercised by all.
 
I thank you.
STATEMENT
 
BY
 
 HER EXCELLENCY
MRS. ANA PAULA S. SACRAMENTO NETO
VICE-MINISTER OF FAMILY AND PROMOTION OF WOMEN
 
COMMISSION ON THE STATUS OF WOMEN
Fifty-Third Session
 
ON AGENDA ITEM 3: Follow-up to the Fourth World Conference on Women and to the twenty-third special session of the General Assembly, entitled “Women 2000: gender equality, development and peace
for the twenty-first century”
 
 
 
PRIORITY THEME: “The equal sharing of responsibilities between women and men, including caregiving in the context of HIV/AIDS”
 
New York, March  4, 2009
 
 
Chairperson,
Excellencies and Distinguished Delegates,
 
It is with great honor that I take the floor at this session on the status of women on behalf of the Government of the Republic of Angola, on my own behalf and on behalf of my delegation. I would like to congratulate you, Mr. Chairperson, as well as your secretariat for having been elected to conduct our work.
My delegation fully associates itself with the statement made by Sudan on behalf of the Member Countries of the G77 and China, and as well as with the statement made by South Africa on behalf of SADC.
We would like to commend all the speakers that have provided us with very comprehensive and valuable information in these past two days under the themes: “The equal sharing of responsibilities between women and men, including caregiving in the context of HIV/AIDS” and “Equal participation of women and men in decision-making processes at all levels”.
 
We also take this opportunity to express our appreciation for the detailed and comprehensive report provided by the Secretary-General and we take note of the recommendations contained therein.
 
Mr. Chairperson ,
 
My Government attaches great importance to the discussion on the priority theme and underlines the undeniable contribution and sacrifices made by Angolan women during our fight for independence and peace, which could only be attained through equal sharing of responsibilities and partnerships at all levels.
 
Promoting gender equality continues to be a cornerstone for my Government’s policies based on gender programmes, with a view to improving the harmonious development of the country, the well being of the families and the consolidation of our democracy.
 
In Angola, we have enacted policies to foster the economic empowerment of Angolan women, especially those active in the informal sector as well as in rural areas through micro-finance programmes and support to rural business projects, since we strongly believe that in addition to having access to education and employment, Angolan women should reduce their economic dependence on men in order to balance the inequalities that are still to be addressed. 
 
However, social, economic and cultural aspects of our society, such as customary laws and discriminatory practices are still some of the challenges that hinder a major involvement of men and boys in the equal sharing of the responsibilities of care giving in the context of HIV/AIDS and the burden involving household work. 
 
Therefore, taking into account these challenges, our strategic plan of combat against HIV/AIDS, elaborated by the Government, aimed to grant universal access to Antiretroviral Drugs and to stop Vertical Transmission, and the HIV/AIDS National Law establish intervention benchmarks calling for the inclusion of information on the pandemic in school curricula and places giving particular emphasis on the need to end discrimination and stigmatization practices against persons living with the disease as well as at equal caregiving between girls and boys.
 
Mr. Chairperson,
 
There have been some important developments in women's political participation in my country. One of the 12 priority areas of the Platform for Action, especially after the election process in September 2008, where Angola increased women’s participation in the decision making process from 9.5% in 2004 to 40% in 2008 at all levels—and here we would like to highlight the increase in women’s participation i n parliament to 41% in 2008, contrasting with 12% in 2004. This represents indeed an important step forward, bearing in mind that by increasing representation in Parliament, women would be able to have a significant impact on policy-making processes and outcomes from a gender perspective.
 
It is fundamental that this step forward goes beyond its statistical meaning. Rather we feel in Angola that it is important to ensure that these gains can be maintained and to encourage women and men to work together towards building a new mentality to end stigmatization and promote gender equality, which, in our view, can be achieved only through granting wide access to education for all, without prejudice against their sex, race or religious belief, as well as employment, adequate housing, health and justice.
 
To conclude, Mr. Chairperson, the Government of Angola reiterates its commitment to continue fostering the sharing of responsibilities, including care giving in the context of prevention of the pandemic, and to supporting the important role that must be played by families and the civil society, while we are consolidating a democratic State strongly committed to Human Rights.
 
Thank you very much.
 
 

 

 

                                              GOVERNMENT OF THE REPUBLIC OF ANGOLA

 
PRESS RELEASE CONCERNING THE REPUBLIC OF GUINEA CONACRY
 
The Government of the Republic of Angola, strictly respecting International Law, states its deep concern for the current crisis in the Republic of Guinea Conacry and condemns the facts that occurred in this country this past September 28, which resulted in the loss of several human lives, deeply affecting coexistence in the country.
 
The Government of the Republic of Angola repudiates the use of violence as a means of resolution of a country's problems.
 
It exhorts the use of restraint, rational and pragmatic dialog as the most appropriate way of negotiating an understanding between the Military Junta, the political parties and civil organizations, and thus defines a realistic political transition period. This should be brought into effect with security and stability, under the authority of the Head of State, by an inclusive National Unification Government that will ensure the protection of citizens and their respective rights and freedoms, creating conditions for holding of free, fair and transparent elections, involving multiple parties. This will ensure the political-constitutional normalization and the establishment of a democratic rule of law in the country. 
 
The Government of the Republic of Angola finds it convenient that this pragmatic solution, to be reached by Guineans, will be implemented with the support and monitoring of the international community, particularly the African Union.
 
The Government of the Republic of Angola encourages the CDEAO to continue its ongoing mediation efforts at Guinea Conackry, seeking a resolution for the crisis.
 
 
Luanda, October 29, 2009
 
THE GOVERNMENT OF THE REPUBLIC OF ANGOLA
PRESS RELEASE
 
CLARIFICATION: THE CURRENT SITUATION IN RESPECT OF RELATIONS BETWEEN ANGOLA AND
THE DEMOCRATIC REPUBLIC OF CONGO
 
 
The Angolan authorities acted legally and properly in September when they repatriated the nationals of a number of countries, including the Republic of Congo and the Democratic Republic of Congo, who had entered and remained in Angola illegally and were involved in diamond mining and trafficking and other unlawful activities, disturbing public law and order and causing serious harm to the economy, the environment and national stability.
 
The repatriation of people who were in the country illegally was done in accordance with the legislation in force in Angola, the African Charter on Human and Peoples’ Rights and the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. It took place within the framework of  new legal provisions for foreigners, which do not target specific groups of foreign nationals but are merely to ensure that the Angolan authorities control migration. 
 
This preventive action by the Angolan government aimed at putting an end to the theft of economic resources crucial to socio-economic development, which could result in violent incidents and social instability in some areas regarded as reserved for the state, was deliberately misunderstood by government authorities and institutions in the neighbouring Republic of Congo and Democratic Republic of Congo.
 
This was followed by a wave of indiscriminate expulsions of Angolans legally resident in the two countries. In the case of the Republic of Congo, the (lesser) misunderstanding was dispelled by means of dialogue between the authorities of our two countries. 
 
The prospect of Angolans being expelled from DR Congo had been latent since the Kahemba dispute in 2007, when the Congolese parliament accused Angola of having invaded the country. 
Relations between Angola and DR Congo became a matter of more serious concern on 28 August 2009, when the Council of Ministers of that country, chaired by Prime Minister Adolphe Muzito, decided to expel all Angolans and nationals of the Republic of Congo who were illegally resident in the country. In practice, this decision affected only Angolans, who started to be subjected to house searches and arbitrary arrests.
 
Following that decision of DR Congo, on 8 October the Angolan government expressed concern about the fact that Angolans who were legally resident in that country, many for several decades, were being indiscriminately deported. They were expelled in absolutely inhumane conditions, subjected to robbery and intimidation by the authorities and local population.
 
With a view to seeking a solution based on international law, to the satisfaction and in the interests of both countries, delegations from the two countries met in Kinshasa on 13 October.
 
In addition to examining the deportation incidents along the 2,511km border between the two countries, the two parties discussed frontier issues, with a view to regulating the demarcation of the land border and the maritime and continental shelf  borders.
 
The main results of that meeting were as follows:
 
 
 
 
 
 
Generally speaking, the current situation is characterised by a twofold crisis. On the one hand, there is illegal migration and, on the other, the DR Congo has shown that is  making territorial claims, through acts that have international legal repercussions.
 
It should be noted, within this context, that the DR Congo has unilaterally demarcated its sea borders with Angola in clear violation of the rules established in the 1982 United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea. 
 
In its relations with adjacent countries, Angola pursues a good neighbourly policy, abiding by the following principles of international law that govern the international community:
 
 
 
 
 
The Angolan government has scrupulously abided by these principles and, in defending its strategic interests with other states, has taken a stance of maintaining constant dialogue and making efforts to strengthen relations of friendship, solidarity and cooperation, in order to create ties intended to ensure active political and economic good neighbourly relations of mutual understanding.
 
The Angolan government reaffirms to the international community its willingness to pursue dialogue with the RD Congo authorities on the controversies related to maritime and land borders, bearing in mind the inalienable principle of the immutability of borders enshrined in the OAU Charter and unanimously adopted by African states when they adopted the Constitutive Act of the African Union.
 
Within the framework of strengthening democracy and political and social stability in the country, the government is planning a new migration policy aimed at harmonising procedures and decision making in the granting of entry visas and residence permits.
 
 
London , 27 October 2009
 
 
PRESS RELEASE
 
CLARIFICATION: THE CURRENT SITUATION IN RESPECT OF RELATIONS BETWEEN ANGOLA AND
THE DEMOCRATIC REPUBLIC OF CONGO
 
 
The Angolan authorities acted legally and properly in September when they repatriated the nationals of a number of countries, including the Republic of Congo and the Democratic Republic of Congo, who had entered and remained in Angola illegally and were involved in diamond mining and trafficking and other unlawful activities, disturbing public law and order and causing serious harm to the economy, the environment and national stability.
 
The repatriation of people who were in the country illegally was done in accordance with the legislation in force in Angola, the African Charter on Human and Peoples’ Rights and the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. It took place within the framework of  new legal provisions for foreigners, which do not target specific groups of foreign nationals but are merely to ensure that the Angolan authorities control migration. 
 
This preventive action by the Angolan government aimed at putting an end to the theft of economic resources crucial to socio-economic development, which could result in violent incidents and social instability in some areas regarded as reserved for the state, was deliberately misunderstood by government authorities and institutions in the neighbouring Republic of Congo and Democratic Republic of Congo.
 
This was followed by a wave of indiscriminate expulsions of Angolans legally resident in the two countries. In the case of the Republic of Congo, the (lesser) misunderstanding was dispelled by means of dialogue between the authorities of our two countries. 
 
The prospect of Angolans being expelled from DR Congo had been latent since the Kahemba dispute in 2007, when the Congolese parliament accused Angola of having invaded the country. 
Relations between Angola and DR Congo became a matter of more serious concern on 28 August 2009, when the Council of Ministers of that country, chaired by Prime Minister Adolphe Muzito, decided to expel all Angolans and nationals of the Republic of Congo who were illegally resident in the country. In practice, this decision affected only Angolans, who started to be subjected to house searches and arbitrary arrests.
 
Following that decision of DR Congo, on 8 October the Angolan government expressed concern about the fact that Angolans who were legally resident in that country, many for several decades, were being indiscriminately deported. They were expelled in absolutely inhumane conditions, subjected to robbery and intimidation by the authorities and local population.
 
With a view to seeking a solution based on international law, to the satisfaction and in the interests of both countries, delegations from the two countries met in Kinshasa on 13 October.
 
In addition to examining the deportation incidents along the 2,511km border between the two countries, the two parties discussed frontier issues, with a view to regulating the demarcation of the land border and the maritime and continental shelf  borders.
 
The main results of that meeting were as follows:
 
 
 
 
 
 
Generally speaking, the current situation is characterised by a twofold crisis. On the one hand, there is illegal migration and, on the other, the DR Congo has shown that is  making territorial claims, through acts that have international legal repercussions.
 
It should be noted, within this context, that the DR Congo has unilaterally demarcated its sea borders with Angola in clear violation of the rules established in the 1982 United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea. 
 
In its relations with adjacent countries, Angola pursues a good neighbourly policy, abiding by the following principles of international law that govern the international community:
 
 
 
 
 
The Angolan government has scrupulously abided by these principles and, in defending its strategic interests with other states, has taken a stance of maintaining constant dialogue and making efforts to strengthen relations of friendship, solidarity and cooperation, in order to create ties intended to ensure active political and economic good neighbourly relations of mutual understanding.
 
The Angolan government reaffirms to the international community its willingness to pursue dialogue with the RD Congo authorities on the controversies related to maritime and land borders, bearing in mind the inalienable principle of the immutability of borders enshrined in the OAU Charter and unanimously adopted by African states when they adopted the Constitutive Act of the African Union.
 
Within the framework of strengthening democracy and political and social stability in the country, the government is planning a new migration policy aimed at harmonising procedures and decision making in the granting of entry visas and residence permits.
 
 
London , 27 October 2009
 
 
GOVERNMENT STATEMENT ON TERRORIST ATTACK
Luanda , 8 January 2010
 
 
The Government of the Republic of Angola hereby states that today, 8 January 2010, at 14.25, the bus in which the Togolese national football team was travelling from Pointe Noire (Republic of Congo) to Cabinda to take part in the 2010 African Cup of Nations tournament came under a terrorist attack by FLEC on the road between Bicongolo and Chicuca, in Cabinda Province, close to the border with the Republic of Congo, in which nine people, eight Togolese and one Angolan, were wounded.
 
According to information from the Angolan Armed Forces in the 2nd military region, the FLEC group that carried out the terrorist attack came from the Republic of Congo and returned there after the attack.  
 
The Angolan Government strongly condemns this infamous act, regrets that there were victims and reaffirms its total commitment to guaranteeing security for the holding of the 2010 African Cup of Nations, which is a great sports event and a demonstration of the friendship and solidarity between African peoples.
 
 
GOVERNMENT STATEMENT ON TERRORIST ATTACK
Luanda , 9 January 2010
 
 
The Government of the Republic of Angola deeply regrets to announce that, following the terrorist attack on 8 January, Amlet Haman, assistant coach of the Togolese team, and the Togolese journalist Stanislaes Ocloo have died.
 
Meanwhile, goalkeeper Kodjovi Obilali, who suffered an injury in the lumbar region,  has been evacuated to South Africa.  
 
The Government of the Republic of Angola expresses its heartfelt condolences to the families of the victims, the members of the Togolese sports delegation and the Government of the Republic of Togo. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Angola UN Mission and US-Angola Chamber of Commerce celebrate Independence Day


New York , 13/11 - The Permanent Mission of Angola to the United Nations in New York and the US-Angola Chamber of Commerce celebrated the 36th anniversary of Angola’s national independence with a dinner that was attended by Miss Universe, Ms. Leila Lopes.

In a statement he made during the dinner, which was held Friday and was attended by some members of the Diplomatic Corps accredited to the United Nations, the Permanent Representative of Angola to the United Nations, Ambassador Ismael Gaspar Martins, said that the sacrifices made "by the best sons of the Fatherland" made independence a reality.

"Today, the country gives steady and significant steps towards political, diplomatic, economic, social and cultural development in an environment of peace and national reconciliation," he said at the event, which was also attended by senior UN officials, the Consul General of Angola in New York, Adão
Pinto, and members of the Miss Universe Organization.

According to the Ambassador, this year’s anniversary was of particular importance, since for the first time in history an Angolan citizen won the Miss Universe title.

"Leila was born after independence, and she is a living example of the benefits of peace, democracy and national reconciliation. Her title brings much joy to Angola and to the African continent,” he stressed, noting that Leila has been a fighter for noble causes such as HIV / AIDS and Malaria.

Very recently, said the Ambassador, she embraced the project to become a Goodwill Drylands Ambassador to Combat Drought and Desertification, and we believe she can play an important role in bringing awareness to the international community towards a greater understanding of the problem and in effecting changes in policy-making
regarding sustainable land management.

In her statement, the President of the US-Angola Chamber of Commerce, Jeannine Scott, congratulated the Angolan people for its 36th year of independence, and said that the country continues to prosper in an environment of peace and stability, while enjoying one of the largest
growth rates in the world.

She stressed that Angola is a major emerging market and an important player in Africa, ensuring that the Chamber of Commerce will continue its mission to promote trade and investment links between Angolan and American companies.

In relation to Miss Universe, Mrs. Scott said she was a reason of great pride for Angola and Africa, and someone that can help promote Angola throughout the world arena.

Leila said she felt happy for the celebration of another anniversary of Angola's independence, this year as Miss Universe, and thanked the support she has received from the Angolan Government for the implementation of social projects.

She said he accepted the invitation to become a Goodwill Drylands Ambassador for the United Nations Convention to Combat Desertification because she considered it important to add her voice to the cause to fight this scourge, because as the world population grows, demand for food will increase.


2009