Statement by Representative of Mongolia
On agenda item 96(b) entitled
Second Committee of the 51st UNGA

New York, 1 November 1996

My delegation fully associates itself with the statement made by Costa Rica on behalf of the Group of 77 and China.

We are pleased to learn from the Trade and Development report and the World Economic and Social development survey for 1996 that registered considerable achievements in the world economy including some improvements accomplished by a number of developing countries. However, against these positive developments persistent imbalances and assymmetries are still dominant in the world economy. The situation is further exacerbated by new protectionism, environmental degradation, the heavy debt burden, constraints to access to technologies and the volatile financial flows to developing countries, as well as stagnation and decline of ODA. Investment flows tend to concentrate only in a few developing countries. Therefore, many poor developing countries have been forced to rely mainly on ODA since they do not have the necessary resources to create favorable environment to attract financial resources and investment.

Globalization and liberalization present both challenges and opportunities for all countries. However many developing countries, in particular, least developed as well as those in disadvantaged geographical and ecological situation are unable to share the benefit offered by the globalization process. They have been kept out from globalization process and continue to face high risks of being marginalized. Most of them have been left outside the regional economic integrations which are considered as outward oriented means towards expanding trade and investment opportunities. In this context I would like to reiterate the firm position of my Government to pursue a policy to join regional economic integrations in general, the Asia Pacific Economic Cooperation /APEC/ and other fora in particular.

Agenda for Development should devote particular attention to critical situation of least developed, land-locked and small island developing countries, as well as economies in transition. In this context Agenda for Development should determine specific actions and ways in order to establish enabling international conditions which provides greater financial and technical assistance, access to financial flows on predictable and assured basis, encouragement of foreign direct investments, durable solution to the debt problems. Agenda for Development should also set the means to implement the main decisions reached at the various major international conferences and summits held under the auspices of the United Nations.

Mongolia, a developing country which is in the process of undergoing overall structural reform, attaches great importance to the Agenda for Development as a major guideline for international cooperation for development in the rest of the 1990s and beyond. My delegation is concerned with slow progress in negotiating the Agenda for Development. Years have elapsed since the General Assembly adopted the resolution 47/181 entitled "Agenda for development" and subsequently World hearings on Development and the High level ECOSOC deliberations on the Agenda which have set in motion a process of a comprehensive re-evaluation of the established pattern and the traditional philosophy of development.

We are expecting that this process will result in coherent and action oriented, pragmatic document that could be translated into action. Long delays in finding a consensus solution may have negative effects on international cooperation for development.

For these years we all have put laborious efforts into it. Achieved results would, hopefully, facilitate a more focused and productive discussion of the agenda item. We have almost completed first two chapters of the Agenda for Development. My delegation agrees that due consideration should be given to new ideas which might provide new strength to the draft document. Government of Mongolia supports the proposal on establishing a development strategy and development target based on a new partnership between developed and developing countries. Setting of goals and targets would facilitate to have a clear vision of the future development in the attainment of which the international community would cooperate. We should move forward building upon what we have already achieved. The language which has already been agreed upon should not be changed. Otherwise we will run a real risk of delaying the Agenda even longer.

Chapter III on institutional issues and the follow-up of the the Agenda for Development is essential for determining the ways and means of effective implementation of the Agenda for Development. It is widely recognized that the development dialogue has to be a central issue in the United Nations agenda. Therefore, General Assembly resolution 50/227 entitled "Restructuring and revitalization of the United Nations in the economic, social and related fields" which was adopted at its 50th session would serve as a solid basis for the forthcoming negotiations on Chapter III.

Development funds and specialized agencies of the United Nations should play greater role in development activities. In this context, it should be emphasized that possibilities exist within the Charter provisions to upgrade the role of ECOSOC so that it could effectively assume these coordinating role. My delegation shares the view that there is an urgent need to strengthen the links of the United Nations and the Bretton Woods institutions. In our considered view their development policies and activities should compliment each other even further.

We are pleased to learn from the Trade and Development report and the World Economic and Social development survey for 1996 that registered considerable achievements in the world economy including some improvements accomplished by a number of developing countries. However, against these positive developments persistent imbalances and assymmetries are still dominant in the world economy. The situation is further exacerbated by new protectionism, environmental degradation, the heavy debt burden, constraints to access to technologies and the volatile financial flows to developing countries, as well as stagnation and decline of ODA. Investment flows tend to concentrate only in a few developing countries. Therefore, many poor developing countries have been forced to rely mainly on ODA since they do not have the necessary resources to create favorable environment to attract financial resources and investment.

Globalization and liberalization present both challenges and opportunities for all countries. However many developing countries, in particular, least developed as well as those in disadvantaged geographical and ecological situation are unable to share the benefit offered by the globalization process. They have been kept out from globalization process and continue to face high risks of being marginalized. Most of them have been left outside the regional economic integrations which are considered as outward oriented means towards expanding trade and investment opportunities. In this context I would like to reiterate the firm position of my Government to pursue a policy to join regional economic integrations in general, the Asia Pacific Economic Cooperation /APEC/ and other fora in particular.

Agenda for Development should devote particular attention to critical situation of least developed, land-locked and small island developing countries, as well as economies in transition. In this context Agenda for Development should determine specific actions and ways in order to establish enabling international conditions which provides greater financial and technical assistance, access to financial flows on predictable and assured basis, encouragement of foreign direct investments, durable solution to the debt problems. Agenda for Development should also set the means to implement the main decisions reached at the various major international conferences and summits held under the auspices of the United Nations.

Mongolia, a developing country which is in the process of undergoing overall structural reform, attaches great importance to the Agenda for Development as a major guideline for international cooperation for development in the rest of the 1990s and beyond. My delegation is concerned with slow progress in negotiating the Agenda for Development. Years have elapsed since the General Assembly adopted the resolution 47/181 entitled "Agenda for development" and subsequently World hearings on Development and the High level ECOSOC deliberations on the Agenda which have set in motion a process of a comprehensive re-evaluation of the established pattern and the traditional philosophy of development.

We are expecting that this process will result in coherent and action oriented, pragmatic document that could be translated into action. Long delays in finding a consensus solution may have negative effects on international cooperation for development.

Mr.Chairman,

For these years we all have put laborious efforts into it. Achieved results would, hopefully, facilitate a more focused and productive discussion of the agenda item. We have almost completed first two chapters of the Agenda for Development. My delegation agrees that due consideration should be given to new ideas which might provide new strength to the draft document. Government of Mongolia supports the proposal on establishing a development strategy and development target based on a new partnership between developed and developing countries. Setting of goals and targets would facilitate to have a clear vision of the future development in the attainment of which the international community would cooperate. We should move forward building upon what we have already achieved. The language which has already been agreed upon should not be changed. Otherwise we will run a real risk of delaying the Agenda even longer.

Chapter III on institutional issues and the follow-up of the the Agenda for Development is essential for determining the ways and means of effective implementation of the Agenda for Development. It is widely recognized that the development dialogue has to be a central issue in the United Nations agenda. Therefore, General Assembly resolution 50/227 entitled "Restructuring and revitalization of the United Nations in the economic, social and related fields" which was adopted at its 50th session would serve as a solid basis for the forthcoming negotiations on Chapter III.

Development funds and specialized agencies of the United Nations should play greater role in development activities. In this context, it should be emphasized that possibilities exist within the Charter provisions to upgrade the role of ECOSOC so that it could effectively assume these coordinating role. My delegation shares the view that there is an urgent need to strengthen the links of the United Nations and the Bretton Woods institutions. In our considered view their development policies and activities should compliment each other even further.