STATEMENT BY HIS EXCELLENCY AMBASSADOR CELSO AMORIM,
MINISTER OF EXTERNAL RELATIONS OF THE 

FEDERATIVE REPUBLIC OF BRAZIL


SECURITY COUNCIL 

 

THEMATIC DEBATE ON COUNTER-TERRORISM

New York, 27 September 2010



Mister President, 

I would like to commend Minister Davutoglu and the Turkish presidency for convening this debate on terrorism.

Terrorism is a scourge that haunts our time. There are no excuses for terrorist acts, which inflict suffering and fear indiscriminately. 

Brazil has always condemned terrorism in all its forms and manifestations. Our Constitution enshrines the repudiation of terrorism as a fundamental principle of our international relations. Brazil is party to all relevant international conventions and protocols against terrorism.

As a serious global threat, terrorism must be addressed from a holistic approach, with full consideration of the complexity of its root causes.

Violence and intolerance take root in an environment of longstanding social, political, economic and cultural injustices. Social and economic development - accompanied by an atmosphere of respect for the other - is the best antidote to terrorism. 

In combating terrorism, Brazil has a strong preference for truly multilateral agreements and arrangements. It is important to reinforce the UN’s capacity in this field. 

Brazil fully supports the United Nations Global Counter-Terrorism Strategy. We appreciate the fact that this Strategy is inspired by a comprehensive perspective. 

We must guard against dangerous rhetoric and postures that fuel xenophobia and prejudice. Tolerance is key to avoid violent polarization and extremism. Initiatives such as the UN Alliance of Civilizations can have a role in this regard. Our Declaration appropriately makes reference to that. 

In the 2003 Conference on combating terrorism, held here in New York, President Lula stressed that the terrorist’s motivations cannot be countered only by repression. Diplomatic initiatives based on International Law are also essential.

Brazil emphasizes the urgent need to conclude the negotiations of a United Nations comprehensive counter-terrorism convention. 

Special attention must be given to the relation of organized crime and the financing of terrorism.

There is also a growing concern that terrorists might have access to weapons of mass destruction, especially to nuclear weapons. At the Nuclear Security Summit in Washington last April, President Lula reaffirmed that - without prejudice to the indispensable security measures that need to be taken - the most effective manner to reduce the risks of nuclear devices falling in the wrong hands is the total and irreversible elimination of all nuclear arsenals. 

Mister President, 

This Council has a unique role both in responding to and preventing terrorism. Our strongest contribution to fight terrorism would be to attain just and sustainable solutions to longstanding agenda items. Peacebuilding efforts can also help avert the spread of radicalism in countries already affected by conflicts and social strife.

Cooperation and capacity building in relation to security measures, as well as broader information sharing, are essential. I reiterate Brazil's full support to the initiatives undertaken by the Security Council committees to facilitate technical assistance to countries that request it. Brazil is ready to cooperate with other countries in this regard. 

It is our common duty to prevent and combat terrorism. Counter-terrorism strategies must be predicated on the rule of law and the full protection of human rights of all involved.

The full realization of universal human rights – including the right to development – must be an integral part of all efforts to combat the terrorist threat.

For all these reasons, Brazil is fully committed to a coordinated and multidimensional response to all the challenges posed by terrorism. The UN should be at the forefront of this endeavor. 

Thank you.